A New Year’s Resolution for 2013 (Sort of…)

Below are some books which I plan to read (or reread) in 2013, God willing. (Note that the list is in particular order.) I’ve included some blurbs from Amazon for those who are interested.

  • Concise Reformed Dogmatics by J. van Genderen. A full treatment of Reformed systematic theology that is accessible to church officers and interested lay readers, as well as teachers and students of theology. Formatted in two visually distinct levels of discussion for use as an introduction or for more in-depth study. 
  • Calvin’s Institutes edited by John McNeill. John Calvin was just twenty-seven years old when the first edition of his Institutes was published in Basel in 1536. Calvin’s “little book” — as he affectionately called it — grew in size throughout the rest of his life; eventually, this early, shorter version evolved into what is now known as the Institutes, the 1559 edition, which Calvin considered the authoritative form of his thought for posterity. / Renowned Calvin scholar Ford Lewis Battles translated the 1536 Institutes in 1975, after completing his masterful translation of the 1559 Institutes. This revised edition of Battles’s translation will interest general readers who wish to better understand the earliest expression of Calvin’s theology, as well as scholars who wish to pursue further research. In addition to Calvin’s own classic text, the book’s four appendices make available in English four significant Reformed texts, including a new translation of Calvin’s preface to Olivétan’s 1535 French Bible. Five indices include an index of biblical references and a comparative table of the 1536 and 1559 Institutes. Numerous citations in the endnotes from the writings of Calvin’s predecessors and contemporaries help place the text in its historical context.
  • Immanuel in Our Place by Tremper Longman III. This book provides fascinating insights into the Old Testament tabernacle and temple, the priesthood, the sacrifices, and festivals. More than that, it shows how Jesus is the fulfillment of Old Testament sacred space, sacred acts, sacred persons, and sacred time. An aid to pastors, teachers, and laymen in teaching and reading the Old Testament, this work will enrich our understanding of Christ and deepen our worship.
  • Josephus, the Complete Works by William Whiston. Encounter the world and traditions that Jesus knewIlluminate your understanding of the New Testament. In The Complete Works you will discover what the New Testament writers knew about Abraham, Moses, Samuel, David, and Solomon and examine an in-depth history of Herod and his infamous family. Josephus left us the earliest independent accounts of the lives of Jesus, John the Baptist, and James the brother of Jesus. Much of what we know about the beliefs of the Sadducees and Pharisees comes from Josephus. Without Josephus, we would know very little about the Essenes, the ancient Jewish group most frequently associated with the Dead Sea Scrolls.
  • D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones (2 Volumes) by Iain Murray. No description from Amazon, but a great book nonetheless.
  • Old Testament Theology by Bruce Waltke. The Old Testament is more than a religious history of the nation of Israel. It is more than a portrait gallery of heroes of the faith. It is even more than a theological and prophetic backdrop to the New Testament. Beyond these, the Old Testament is inspired revelation of the very nature, character, and works of God. As renowned Old Testament scholar Bruce Waltke writes in the preface of this book, the Old Testament’s every sentence is ‘fraught with theology, worthy of reflection.’ This book is the result of decades of reflection informed by an extensive knowledge of the Hebrew language, the best of critical scholarship, a deep understanding of both the content and spirit of the Old Testament, and a thoroughly evangelical conviction. Taking a narrative, chronological approach to the text, Waltke employs rhetorical criticism to illuminate the theologies of the biblical narrators. Through careful study, he shows that the unifying theme of the Old Testament is the ‘breaking in of the kingdom of God.’ This theme helps the reader better understand not only the Old Testament, but also the New Testament, the continuity of the entire Bible, and ultimately, God himself.

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And finally, a note from WordPress: According to my WordPress stats, “4,329 films were submitted to the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. This blog had 16,000 views in 2012. If each view were a film, this blog would power 4 Film Festivals. In 2012, there were 104 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 606 posts. There were 176 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 76 MB. That’s about 3 pictures per week. The busiest day of the year was October 13th with 158 views. The most popular post that day was Tom, Dick, and Harry.

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